Band of the Day

2014.05.17

Hunterchild

Electronic R&B explorations from a similar orbit as James Blake and The Weeknd
Sometimes I lay in bed at night and think of all that's good and bad, then I start thinkin' bout you thinkin' bout the things I've never had.
lyrics from Time Traveling Lover

A few years ago, an unknown group from an unlikely town began generating the kind of "next big thing" blog buzz that eventually leads to a big label bidding war, support slots on major tours, and unanimous praise. For Bloomington, Indiana's Dreamers of the Ghetto, it resulted in a divorce and a devastating break-up.

"Someone I loved once gave me a box full of darkness. It took me years to understand that this too, was a gift." – Mary Oliver

Singer/songwriter/multi-instrumentalist Luke Aaron Jones and fellow DOTG alum Marty Sprowles picked up the pieces and pared down the widescreen stadium-sized rock of Dreamers to the more intimate, introspective Hunterchild. Jones' vocals are more arresting than ever, indebted as much to vintage Peter Gabriel, Prince, and Depeche Mode as the rich well of electronic R&B explorations from a similar orbit as James Blake and The Weeknd in their most powerful moments. Hunterchild are comfortable in their own skin in a way that's almost unheard of for debut artists.

Co-produced with Kevin Ratterman (My Morning Jacket, Wax Fang), Hunterchild's eponymous debut album is noticeably more eclectic than Dreamers of the Ghetto. From the beat-heavy sexploits of "Part Time" to the stark falsetto professions of "Aching," this is a story in 11 parts. Equally complicated, heartbreaking and revelatory, Hunterchild bares an emotional fearlessness that only comes from a devotion to the light in the face of total darkness.