Band of the Day

2013.04.06

John Hiatt

A Southern singer-songwriter with over 30 years of whiskey-soaked blues/country under his belt
The sun come up every morning, even when it's too cloudy to see. I was willing to lose that years ago, I don't know what was the matter with me.
lyrics from We're Alright Now

John Hiatt’s career as a performer and songwriter has spanned more than 30 years and everyone from Bob Dylan, Eric Clapton, BB King, Bonnie Raitt and Iggy Pop has covered his work. Hiatt began his solo career with the 1974 album Hangin’ Around the Observatory. His landmark 1987 release Bring The Family, which celebrates its 25th anniversary this year, was his first album to chart in the U.S. 2000’s Crossing Muddy Waters was called “The most natural and relaxed John Hiatt album in years...” by All Music Guide. In 2008, Hiatt released Same Old Man, was inducted into the Nashville Songwriters Hall of Fame and was honored by the Americana Music Association with their prestigious “Lifetime Achievement in Songwriting Award.” Critical acclaim continued for The Open Road (2010) with The Boston Herald praising “Hiatt knocks together a rocking, full-throttle road record that in its tone, toughness and mix of blues, r & b and country harkens back to his landmark Bring the Family” while the Associated Press proclaimed “Hiatt remains at the top of his game” in reference to Dirty Jeans and Mudslide Hymns (2011.)

For Mystic Pinball, Hiatt’s 21st studio album, Hiatt turned to producer Kevin “Caveman” Shirley (Aerosmith, Iron Maiden, Joe Bonamassa.) Shirley also produced Hiatt’s highly praised Dirty Jeans And Mudslide Hymns, which the New York Times declared was “...his best since 1995.” Hiatt relies on the exceptional musical skills of Doug Lancio (electric guitar, mandolin, Dobro), Kenneth Blevins (drums and percussion) and Patrick O’Hearn (bass) to play with him on the record.

Hiatt and his band, The Combo, have gained a reputation for captivating crowds at their live shows as The Tennessean depicts: “He prowls the stage, delivering the bluesy stuff in a whiskey-burn howl, shouting the rock stuff and fronting a formidable band that can turn on a dime, from ballads to bombast.”