Band of the Day

2012.10.04

CFCF

Meditative, hypnotic electronic soundscapes from a Montreal producer
CFCF's latest critically acclaimed release is 2012's Exercises, eight tracks of mysterious electronic compositions that often lack beats or vocals, instead relying on Silver's ability to spin simple parts into mesmerizing panoramas.
quote from Band of the Day Review

CFCF is the stage name of Canadian electronic musician Michael Silver. Based in Montreal, Silver took the name CFCF from the call sign of the city’s CFCF-TV.

For his new EP ‘Exercises’, out April 24th on Paper Bag Records, CFCF shows a different side of his palette with a series of subdued piano and synth based pieces. Pulling from influences like Philip Glass, Ryuichi Sakamoto and David Borden, among others, and using institutional architecture and 70s Canadiana as a framework, the EP has a distinctly 20th century feel.

CFCF is the project of Montreal based musician Michael Silver. You may have heard some of the whimsical remixes he's done for big name house acts like Justice, Holy Ghost!, and the Presets, but his personal work has more in common with Brian Eno or Philip Glass than those merchants of untz. Largely instrumental and placid as an alpine lake, his work is intriguing and enchanting. Though largely under five minutes, CFCF's (named after Montreal's CFCF-TV television station) music takes you on a mini journey as the music gently shifts across landscapes in a style reminiscent of classical music.

CFCF's latest critically acclaimed release is 2012's Exercises, eight tracks of mysterious electronic compositions that often lack beats or vocals, instead relying on Silver's ability to spin simple parts into mesmerizing panoramas. “Exercise 2 (School)” is gorgeously tranquil: clicking beats, soaring synths and keyboards chiming like icicles warming as Spring comes. The three minute track is essentially one long loop, which gives it zen-like calm as it repeats. Other tracks, like “Exercise 3 (Buildings)” lean more towards the melancholic side of things. With its lonely, spiraling piano and spacy synths that shoot off into infinity it could soundtrack a solitary day on Jupiter or Winter scene in a indie film.

A few of the cuts off of CFCF's 2009 breakout full-length Continent are warmer, but no less captivating. “You Hear Colours” rumbles along on a beat heavy with tribal toms and ultra smooth rainbow colored synths. Then Silver allows things to subtly shift as dramatic guitars come in and it's like you're in a convertible, cruising through some urban landscape in an 80s movie.

CFCF may not be immediately hook-y much of the time, but his delicate compositions pack a keen emotional punch as Silver manages to take you along with him on his exotic wanderings.