Band of the Day

2012.03.31

Rustie

Rich and exuberant genre-bending electronic dance
He's got the skittering, cutting room floor melodicism of Skrillex, and some of the low-end attack of dubstep, but without any of the raging-factory-equipment bass growls that's made that genre so controversial.
Band of the Day Review

Rustie, born Russell Whyte is a young electronic music producer originally from Glasgow, Scotland, now living in London. The DJ/producer is known for his 2011 break-through album Glass Swords which features a maximalist sound combining hip hop, dub step and house in a whirlwind of synths and beats. The native Glaswegian grew up in a musical household and first became interested in rock, playing in local bands. He soon became entranced with electronic music, learning to DJ and produce on his PC. Rustie became active in the Glaswegian Lucky Me collective and eventually signed to the legendary EDM label Warp, which released Glass Swords in October 2011. The album received widespread critical praise, and Rustie toured extensively in support of the album. Rustie has since moved to London, where he currently resides.

Scottish producer Rustie is an electronic dance superhero. He stuffs his music with as much as possible, wielding clichés with daring, somehow breathing new life into them until they sparkle with hysterical bliss. The London-based producer has enjoyed acclaim since the October 2011 release of his debut album Glass Swords; thirteen energetic tracks that simultaneously exist at, and beyond, the crossroads of seemingly everything that's going on in dance music right now. He's got the skittering, cutting room floor melodicism of Skrillex, and some of the low-end attack of dubstep, but without any of the raging-factory-equipment bass growls that's made that genre so controversial. A good example of Rustie's exciting, genre-bending style, “Surph” begins with a long build of slowly accelerating claps, a rich synth chord and spaceship sirens. Finally hitting the drop, Rustie darts into some interstellar funk, cutting up R&B vocal samples and pasting them back together synthesized and energized. Along with its crowd-pleasing dance-floor beat, “Surph” features the kind of vivid synths you hear in swanky clubs the world over, but it circles half-spastically around the track, coming in and out of focus and sounding fresh. “Ultra Thizz” is the heart of Glass Swords. After the clap heavy intro build, the producer unleashes a tropical storm of swirling, manipulated vocal samples and jabbing synthesizers. With the vaguely 80s sheen of the synth tones and modern electro feel, it's got a retro-futurist vibe, as if you were driving around Miami in a flying convertible getting pummeled by a tropical storm of neon triangles. “All Nite” rides waves of sexy, shimmering synths, while more R&B vocal samples give it some hooky humanity. Glass Swords is one of those rare albums that tries to do everything at once, and is all the better for it.